My Top 5 Simple and Effective Fonts for your design needs

Helvetica

Helvetica is a widely used sans-serif typeface developed in 1957 by Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffmann.

It is a neo-grotesque or realist design, one influenced by the famous 19th century typeface Akzidenz-Grotesk and other German and Swiss designs. Its use became a hallmark of the International Typographic Style that emerged from the work of Swiss designers in the 1950s and 60s, becoming one of the most popular typefaces of the 20th century.[1] Over the years, a wide range of variants have been released in different weights, widths and sizes, as well as matching designs for a range of non-Latin alphabets. Notable features of Helvetica as originally designed include the termination of all strokes on horizontal or vertical lines and unusually tight letter spacing, which give it a dense, compact appearance.

buy Font here  https://www.fonts.com/font/linotype/helvetica

 

Garamond

Garamond is a group of many old-style serif typefaces, originally those designed by Parisian craftsman Claude Garamond and other 16th century French engravers, and now many modern revivals. Though his name was written as ‘Garamont’ in his lifetime, the typefaces are generally spelled ‘Garamond’.

buy font here  https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/adobe-garamond/licensing.html

 

Futura

Futura is a geometric sans-serif typeface designed in 1927[1] by Paul Renner. It was designed as a contribution on the New Frankfurt-project. It is based on geometric shapes that became representative of visual elements of the Bauhaus design style of 1919–33.[2][3] It was commissioned as a typeface by the Bauer Type Foundry, in reaction to Ludwig & Mayer‘s seminal Erbar of 1922.

buy here  https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/futura/#index

 

Century Gothic

Century Gothic is a sans-serif typeface in the geometric style, released by Monotype Imaging in 1991.[1][2] It is strongly influenced by the font Futura, though with a higher x-height, and its design history also derives from two separate typefaces intended as Futura competitors. It is a digital typeface that has never been made into actual foundry type.

buy here  https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/mti/century-gothic/

 

Gill Sans

Gill Sans is a sans-serif typeface designed by Eric Gill and released by the British branch of Monotype from 1928 onwards.

Gill Sans takes inspiration from the calligrapher and lettering artist Edward Johnston’s 1916 “Underground Alphabet”, the corporate font of London Underground, now (although not at the time) most often simply called the “Johnston” typeface. Gill as a young artist had assisted Johnston in its early development stages. In 1926, Douglas Cleverdon, a young printer and later a BBC executive, opened a bookshop in Bristol, and Gill painted a fascia for the shop in sans-serif capitals. In addition, Gill sketched an alphabet for Cleverdon as a guide for him to use for notices and announcements. By this time Gill had become a prominent stonemason, artist and creator of lettering in his own right and had begun to work on creating typeface designs.

Buy it here  https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/mti/gill-sans/

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